Friday, July 17, 2015

Brosé: The French, The Oregonian, and the Washingtonian

There's a side of me that almost gave a second thought about adding "Brosé" to the title of this blog, but I think it needs to be addressed. The new, yet hopefully short trend in the USA is the name, Brosé.  Somehow, somewhere, someone gave "permission" to the male wine consumer that it was okay to drink that pretty pink wine, but only if it is referred to as "Brosé." 

Nonsense! Tell that to many generations of men in Provence who have been sipping on the Bandols and Coteaux d'Aix-en-Provence during a game of pétanque. Tell that silly term to the men of the Loire Valley who sips on a glass of Reuilly or the pink Chinons. Oh, and I dare you to discount Rosé Champagne: the queen of Rosé. 

A few moons ago, I was working as a part-time tasting room attendant and we introduced one of the very first Rosés in the Walla Walla Valley. It was a tough sale at first, and especially to the men-folk.  Once we convinced them to taste this luscious bright Syrah Rosé, they were sold - - especially when you gave them food pairing ideas, such as: grilled seafood, croque-monsieur (grilled ham and cheese sandwich), smoked sausages, and poultry.  

How did we convince our male customers to take their first sip of this Rosé? We slipped in a few special words, "Produced by a French winemaker ... just like they do in France ... He produced it ... just like they do in France ... dry and crisp ... just like those wines of France ..." 

French or France was the key to this game of sales, yet the new Rosé lover went home with a treasure, and some wine education.

There are days I need to go in hiding. There are times I get so busy with writing or home projects, I forget the time, the month, and finally realize I haven't even left the county. Just this April was one of those times when it occurred to me I hadn't left since I started my book project - over a year ago. It was time to pack my bags and go.  There's a tiny little cabin I am rather fond of at Wallowa Lake, Oregon where I like to hide. So, I packed many books, enough food for 3-4 days and most important, three bottles of some of my favorite Rosés - - from France, Oregon, and Washington. 

Domaine St. Aix, "AIX" Rosé (Coteaux d'Aix en Provence), 2014 -  This 130 year old winery, located in the south of France, has produced a very pale pink wine, almost clear. The aroma in the glass is ripe of fresh thyme and berries. It's a traditional blend of Grenache, Cinsault, and Syrah.  It is delicate in taste, but the Herbs of Provence still shine through with crisp acids, and fruits of raspberries, cherries, vanilla, and a hint of mineral in the finish. 

Stoller Family Estate Dundee Hills Oregon Pinot Noir Rosé, 2014 - this Rosé first caught my attention almost eight years ago and I have been seeking it out ever since. It always makes an appearance in my wine refrigerator. The color-palette is a little richer shade of pink. The nose is of watermelon and rose petals. The palate brings forth more watermelon and raspberries, making it thirst quenching with it's bright acids. I've actually had a couple of occasions to sip this pretty wine in the Stoller Estate Vineyards during the hot month of August. Again, it just quenched my thirst, as well as adding to the romance of a vineyard.  

Maison Bleue Winery "Lisette" Rosé of Grenache, 2014 - I've been drinking this Rosé, since I have been aware of the existence of Washington State winemaker and Maison Bleue owner, Jon Meuret and his elegant Rhone-style wines. Raspberries and flowers reach the nose of this lovely pale peach-colored wine. Strawberries, plums, and spice, with a reminder - just a reminder of mineral in the finish. This wine is intricate, yet elegant, but still perfect for laid back porch sippin' and very special when paired with light summer meals. 

If you can hang onto these great Rosés long enough, I would even recommend the Stoller and Maison Bleue Rosés especially to pair with a Thanksgiving turkey. Maybe I will take a couple bottles back to the mountains this fall. 

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